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101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences

101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences

NewLearningGuide School of Social Sciences and Psychology Disciplines of Social Sciences LEARNING GUIDE 101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences 2013-Autumn TABLE OF CONTENTS UNIT WEEKLY SCHEDULE

…………………………………………………………………………………………. 2 1.0 UNIT DETAILS, STAFFING, AND HELP…………………………………………………………………….. 3 1.1 Unit details………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3 1.2 What to do if you need help?……………………………………………………………………………….. 3 2.0 UNIT CONTENT …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 2.1 Handbook summary ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 2.2 Unit content ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 2.3 Mode of delivery ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4 2.4 Attendance requirements and workload ……………………………………………………………….. 4 2.5 Changes to unit in response to student feedback……………………………………………………. 4 3.0 UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES……………………………………………………………………………….. 4 4.0 HOW DO ACTIVITIES AND ASSESSMENTS RELATE TO LEARNING OUTCOMES?…………….. 5 5.0 ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW ……………………………………………………………………………………. 5 6.0 TEXTBOOK(S) AND RESOURCES……………………………………………………………………………. 5 6.1 Required textbook(s)…………………………………………………………………………………………… 5 6.2 Readings, resources, and web-links ………………………………………………………………………. 5 6.3 Referencing style guide ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 6 6.4 Other Resources…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 6 6.5 Other ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6 ASSESSMENT 1: WEEKLY ONLINE LEARNING ACTIVITIES……………………………………………….. 7 ASSESSMENT 2: THEORETICAL ESSAY ………………………………………………………………………… 7 ASSESSMENT 3: CASE STUDY REPORT………………………………………………………………………… 9 ASSESSMENT 4: NO FOURTH ASSESSMENT……………………………………………………………….. 11 LIST OF ATTACHMENTS Social Science Student Resources Cover Sheets 101555 Cover sheets for Assessments 1 and 2 ABOUT ATTACHMENTS Attachments are part of this Learning Guide. They are listed as separate files in the Attachments Navigation pane (with the paperclip icon) to the left. (or perhaps at bottom if you use an older Adobe reader.) Click on the attachment name in the navigation pane to open the file in another window. If you print the Learning Guide you will need to open and print attachment files separately. © University of Western Sydney, 2012 Template Designer: Adelma M. Hills Template Author: Martin DalyLearning Guide 2013-Autumn 101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences Page 2 of 11 UNIT WEEKLY SCHEDULE Week Week Starts Lectures Tutorials Readings and Assessments 1 25/02/2013 Teaching Introduction to course and Morality Mick Houlbrook/Natalie Bolzan No tutorial this week 2 4/03/2013 Teaching Consequentialist Theories of Ethics & Morality Michael Kennedy Discussion of Case study READINGS AND vUWS WORK TO BE DONE BEFORE CLASSES: Read Thiroux and Krasemann Chapters 1 and 2. Quizzes and questions on Chapter 1 3 11/03/2013 Teaching Non-consequentialist Theories of morality Michael Kennedy Debate Read Thiroux and Krasemann Chapter 3 Quizzes and questions on Chapters 2 and 3 4 18/03/2013 Teaching Virtue ethics and continental philosophy Mick Houlbrook Reflection and discussion Read Thiroux and Krasemann Chapter 4 Quizzes and questions 5 25/03/2013 Teaching Absolutism vs Relativism Mick Houlbrook Perspectives Presentation Read Thiroux and Krasemann Chapter 5 Quizzes and questions 6 1/04/2013 Teaching Freedom vs Determinism Mick Houlbrook Perspectives Presentation Read Thiroux and Krasemann Chapter 6 Quizzes and questions 7 8/04/2013 Teaching Setting up an ethical and moral system Mick Houlbrook Presentation Moral and Ethical system Read Chapter 8 Thiroux and Krasemann and Chapter 6 Carmody. Quizzes and questions ASSESSMENT 2: Theoretical essay hard copy due BEFORE 5:00pm on 11th April after submission to Turnitin 8 15/04/2013 Intra-Session Break INTRA SESSION BREAK: NO LECTURES INTRA SESSION BREAK: NO TUTORIALS INTRA SESSION BREAK 9 22/04/2013 Teaching Public Holiday No Classes this week guided study. Revision of theoretical perspectives on ethics and morality. 10 29/04/2013 Teaching Professional Codes of Ethics Mick Houlbrook Activity related to own codes Read relevant code of ethics on vUWS Quizzes and questions 11 6/05/2013 Teaching Ethical issues in personal relationships Moira Carmody Discussion Read Carmody Chapter 6 & 7 Quizzes and questions 12 13/05/2013 Teaching Lying cheating breaking promises Michael Kennedy Discussion and debate Read Thiroux and Krasemann Chapter 12 Quizzes and questions 13 20/05/2013 Teaching Ethical issues in healt Natalie Bolzanh Perspectives discussion Read Thiroux and Krasemann chapters 10, 11 and 14 Quizzes and questions on Chapter 14 ASSESSMENT 3: Case Study Report hard copy due BEFORE 5:00pm on Thursday 23rd May after submission to Turnitin 14 27/05/2013 Teaching Environmental ethics Mick Houlbrook Case study & Evaluation Read Thiroux and Krasemann Chapter 16 Quizzes on Chapter 16 15 3/06/2013 STUVAC STUVAC Study Vacation: Study for final examination, which will be conducted during the UWS Formal Examination Period 16-18 10/06/2013 Exam Period FORMAL EXAMINATION PERIODLearning Guide 2013-Autumn 101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences Page 3 of 11 1.0 UNIT DETAILS, STAFFING, AND HELP 1.1 Unit details Unit Coordinator: Dr Mick Houlbrook Unit level: 2 Credit points: 10 Campus: Bankstown (Day), Penrith (Day) Prerequisites: Students must have 40 credit points of completed study prior to being able to enrol in this unit. Co-requisites: Incompatible unit(s): Enrolment restrictions: Assumed knowledge: Legislative restrictions: Essential equipment: You must have access to the internet for this unit, preferably high speed broadband. You can access the IT computer laboratories if you do not have this access at home. Online requirements: Regular access to the unit’s vUWS site is essential. Students need to check each of their vUWS sites at least once a week, and preferably every 2 or 3 days, to check for any email, announcements, or new unit materials, including any variations to the Learning Guide that might be needed. Teaching staff: Lecturers: Prof. Natalie Bolzan Prof. Moira Carmody Dr Michael Houlbrook Dr Michael Kennedy Tutors: Various Contact and consultation: Dr Mick Houlbrook Email: m.houlbrook@uws.edu.au Bankstown campus Room 1.1.75 Telephone: 02 9772 6348 Consultation: Mondays 10am – 2pm and Wednesdays 10am – 12pm 1.2 What to do if you need help? Step 1: Read this Learning Guide (including attachments, especially the Social Science Student Resources Step 2: Check the unit vUWS site for the information you need. Step 3: Direct your enquiry to ssap@uws.edu.au Note: We expect you to have searched for answers to your administrative questions in the unit Learning Guide and its attachments, before contacting any member of staff. Staff may not respond to emails, questions, or requests for help where answers are readily obtainable in the Learning Guide or attachments, or through links provided to other sources of information. For advice regarding the subject matter of the unit, consult your tutor during class time, or cons
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t with the Unit Coordinator according to the Consultation details in the previous section. Students are expected to be adequately prepared when they seek advice from teaching staff, having done sufficient background work themselves, and with clear questions rather than vague requests about what to do. Be aware of your rights and responsibilities: You must be aware of the key UWS policies and information affecting students, found at this link: http://www.uws.edu.au/learning_teaching/learning_and_teaching/office_of_the_pro-vicechancellor/key_policies_and_information_affecting_students First year students: First year students experiencing difficulties, or needing assistance or support to adjust to University life, should consult with the first year advisor.Learning Guide 2013-Autumn 101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences Page 4 of 11 Make sure you are an informed adult-learner: If you are a new student coming straight from school, please understand that being a university student is very different to being a school student. Your first day at University is the start of your professional career where you take responsibility for yourself as a professional adult learner. To give yourself the best chance of having a satisfying University experience, and to maximise your prospects for success, you need to take control of your own learning. This means ensuring you are as informed as possible at all times and not reliant on asking for help from others – except, of course, when you have exhausted all other options. It is very important, therefore – and this applies to all students – that in the first week of semester you set sufficient time aside to read this Learning Guide and all its attachments fully and carefully. You need to ensure you are completely familiar with the requirements of the unit and all the support services and sources of information available to you. 2.0 UNIT CONTENT 2.1 Handbook summary This unit introduces students to the nature of western ethics and moral discourses, to ethical methodology and to the possibilities and limits of ethical discourse and practice. It covers the history of the formalisation of ethics as well as its current philosophical and sociological dimensions. It also deals with various case studies of ethical issues and moral debates students may encounter in their everyday day and professional lives. Students will be invited to reflect on moral discourse(s) and on the use of ethics for social justice and fairness. 2.2 Unit content • History of the formalisation of ethics • Philosophical dimensions of ethics • Sociological dimensions of ethics • Ethics and citizenship • Ethics and Social Action • Critical study of current professional ethical codes • Study of case studies of decision making and action 2.3 Mode of delivery The unit is delivered by means of weekly 1-hour lectures and 1-hour tutorials. 2.4 Attendance requirements and workload Students are expected to attend all lectures and tutorials and to participate actively in all class activities. Failure to do so may seriously undermine a student’s ability to complete the unit satisfactorily. Attendance records may be consulted in the assessment of any requests for extensions or Special Consideration. You should advise the Unit Coordinator or your tutor if you are unable to attend a tutorial due to illness or misadventure. This unit is worth 10 credit points, indicating that success in the unit requires at least 10 hours work per week. Three hours will be lecture/tutorial time and the remaining 7 hours should be devoted to reading and study, assessment preparation, and revision. In this unit you will need to devote much of this time to reading the textbook and reading materials. 2.5 Changes to unit in response to student feedback Student feedback on quizzes has led to a modified quiz format in the unit. 3.0 UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES In this unit, Graduate Attributes are achieved through the following Learning Outcomes attained by students: On completion of this unit, students will be able to: 1. Apply skills in reflexivity to an understanding of everyday lives and social actionsLearning Guide 2013-Autumn 101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences Page 5 of 11 2. Demonstrate in written form how ethics are constructed and understood in everyday life and in a social structure 3. Identify the significance of key concepts in moral and ethics in the context of a range of contemporary issues 4. Identify the relationship between ethics, social justice and social fairness 4.0 HOW DO ACTIVITIES AND ASSESSMENTS RELATE TO LEARNING OUTCOMES? Assessment 1 (Weekly online learning activities) assesses Learning Outcomes 1 and 3. Assessment 2 (Theoretical Essay) assesses Learning Outcomes 2 and 3. Assessment 3 (Case Study Report) assesses Learning Outcomes 1 and 4. 5.0 ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW All the assessment items below are compulsory and must be completed before you are eligible to pass the unit, regardless of how many marks you accumulate. In addition, to pass this unit, you must obtain a minimum overall mark of 50%, aggregated across all weighted assessments. Detailed information on each assessment is provided at the end of this Learning Guide. There is a 10% tolerance on all word limits. There is no resubmission of assessments. Final marks and grades are subject to confirmation by the School Assessment Committee which may scale, modify, or otherwise amend the marks and grades for the unit, as may be required by University policies Format and Details Length/Duration Due Date and Time ASSESSMENT 1: Weekly online learning activities Weighting: 20% Weekly activities 1 hour per week E-Learning– assessed through quizzes Each Week from Week 2 before the lecture ASSESSMENT 2: Theoretical Essay Weighting: 40% Essay 1000 words BEFORE 5PM Week 7 (day of lecture) ASSESSMENT 3: Case study report Weighting: 40% Report 2000 words BEFORE 5PM Week 13 (day of lecture) ASSESSMENT 4: No fourth assessment Weighting: 0% 6.0 TEXTBOOK(S) AND RESOURCES 6.1 Required textbook(s) Thiroux, J. P. and Krasemann, K.W. (2012) Ethics Theory and Practice 11th Ed London, England: Pearson International Edition. 6.2 Readings, resources, and web-links Recommended textbooks Carmody, M. (2009) Sex and Ethics Young People and Ethical Sex Melbourne, Palgrave Macmillan Library resources and linksLearning Guide 2013-Autumn 101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences Page 6 of 11 Arneson, R. J. (2002) “Equality” in R.L. Simon (ed.) The Blackwell Guide to Social and Political Philosophy. Blackwell, Oxford. http://voyager.uws.edu.au/cgi-bin/Pscandoc.cgi?app=33&folder=14717&doc=1 Blackburn, Simon., 2002. Relatively speaking. Think; Autumn, pp. 83-88. Royal institute of Philosophy; 2002 http://voyager.uws.edu.au/cgi-bin/Pscandoc.cgi?app=33&folder=14648&doc=1 Cohen, S. (2002) Top down and bottom up reasoning, reflective equilibrium from The nature of moral reasoning. Oxford University Press. http://voyager.uws.edu.au/cgi-bin/Pscandoc.cgi?app=33&folder=14707&doc=1 Delattre, Edwin J (2006). Character and cops : ethics in policing 5th Edition Washington, D.C. : AEI Press, Gambrill, E (ed) (2009) Social work ethics Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, Hardin, G. “lifeboat ethics” in D. Van DeVeer & C. Price (1998) (eds.) The Environmental Ethics and Policy Book, 2nd. ed. Wadsworth, USA http://voyager.uws.edu.au/cgi-bin/Pscandoc.cgi?app=33&folder=14713&doc=1 Hinman, L. M. 2008, Extracts from Chpt.2 Understanding the diversity of moral beliefs. Ethics: a pluralistic approach to moral theory.4th.ed. pp 25-28. Thomson Wadsworth. http://voyager.uws.edu.au/cgibin/Pscandoc.cgi?app=33&folder=14659&doc=1 Hinman L. M. (2003) Chapter 5 Ethics of Consequences: utilitarianism from Ethics: A pluralistic approach to Moral theory. 3rd. Ed. Thomas Wadsworth, Australia. http://voyager.uws.edu.au/cgibin/Pscandoc.cgi?app=33&folder=14711&doc=1 Locke, J. (1690) extract from Book II of his Two Treatise of Civil Government from Peter Singer (ed.) Ethics (Oxford Reader), Oxford University Press, Oxford. (1994). http://voyager.uws.edu.au/cgibin/Pscandoc.cgi?app=33&amp
;folder=14715&
amp;doc=1 Mill, J.S., (1863) Extracts from Utillitarianism Chapter One General Remarks: http://www.utilitarianism.com/mill1.htm Chapter 2 What Utilitarianism Is. http://www.utilitarianism.com/mill2.htm Nagel, Thomas., 1987, Right and wrong. What does it all mean? : a very short introduction to philosophy; Chpt. 7, pp.59-75 http://voyager.uws.edu.au/cgi-bin/Pscandoc.cgi?app=33&folder=14662&doc=1 Sen, A. (1992) “Why Equality? What Equality?” from Inequality Reexamined. Harvard University Press. http://voyager.uws.edu.au/cgi- bin/Pscandoc.cgi?app=33&folder=14716&doc=1 Singer, P. (2000) “Famine, Affluence and Morality” in Writings on an Ethical Life. Fourth Estate, London http://voyager.uws.edu.au/cgi-bin/Pscandoc.cgi?app=33&folder=14721&doc=1 Williams, B. (1973) A critique of utilitarianism (excerpts), in Smart and Williams, Utilitarianism: for and against. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. http://voyager.uws.edu.au/cgibin/Pscandoc.cgi?app=33&folder=14712&doc=1 6.3 Referencing style guide The referencing requirement for units in Social Science is the Harvard style. Full details on the Harvard style of referencing can be found at: http://library.uws.edu.au/FILES/cite_Harvard.pdf 6.4 Other Resources N/A 6.5 Other N/ALearning Guide 2013-Autumn 101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences Page 7 of 11 ASSESSMENT 1: Weekly online learning activities Weighting: 20% Assessment format: Weekly activities Length/Duration: 1 hour per week E-Learning– assessed through quizzes Due date and time: Each Week from Week 2 before the lecture Late penalty: If the assignment is submitted (without an approved extension) after the due date and time, it will attract a late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) up to a maximum of 10 days, at which time the penalty will be 100% of what the assignment is worth. Assessments will not be accepted after the marked assessment task has been returned to students who submitted the task on time. Also see section on Extension, Special Consideration, and late assignment penalties in attached Social Science Student Resources document. Submission method: Online Is assessment compulsory? Yes, you must complete this assessment in order to be eligible to pass the unit (as explained in Section 5) regardless of the aggregate mark you achieve across assessments. Is Cover Sheet required? No, not required ASSESSMENT 1: Description and instructions Each week from Week 2 you will be required to • read the Chapter identified in the Learning Guide for that week from one of the two text books AND • complete the specified on-line quiz available on the Ethics in the Social Sciences vUWS page BEFORE the lecture. The quizzes and on-line tasks are based on the reading for that week. The chapters are from the required texts. Thiroux, J. P. and Krasemann, K.W. (2009) Ethics Theory and Practice 10th Ed London, England: Pearson International Edition. and for weeks 7 and 11 from, Carmody, M. (2009) Sex and Ethics Young People and Ethical Sex Melbourne, Palgrave Macmillan You need to demonstrate knowledge of the topic prior to attending the class through on-line quiz completion. The quizzes will be marked and summed, providing you with a total for Assessment Item 1. NB: You may attempt the quiz as many times as you like within the period it is available, BUT you should save each attempt or the questions may change. The last attempt will be recorded as your mark. Repeating the attempts will not necessarily improve your score – reading the chapter(s) thoroughly will. ASSESSMENT 1: Criteria and standards The criteria for successful completion of this assessment are based simply on the numerical scores in the online tests. Note that a maximum of three attempts is allowed for each weekly test. The tests are based on the specific readings in the text. ASSESSMENT 2: Theoretical Essay Weighting: 40% Assessment format: Essay Length/Duration: 1000 words Due date and time: BEFORE 5PM Week 7 (day of lecture)Learning Guide 2013-Autumn 101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences Page 8 of 11 Late penalty: If the assignment is submitted (without an approved extension) after the due date and time, it will attract a late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) up to a maximum of 10 days, at which time the penalty will be 100% of what the assignment is worth. Assessments will not be accepted after the marked assessment task has been returned to students who submitted the task on time. Also see section on Extension, Special Consideration, and late assignment penalties in attached Social Science Student Resources document. Submission method: Turnitin and hard copy to relevant School of Social Sciences and Psychology assignment box Is assessment compulsory? Yes, you must complete this assessment in order to be eligible to pass the unit (as explained in Section 5) regardless of the aggregate mark you achieve across assessments. Is Cover Sheet required? Yes, you must use the correct cover sheet located in the Cover Sheets attachment ASSESSMENT 2: Description and instructions Due on the day of the lecture of Week 7, strictly no later than 5pm in the assignment boxes in the School of Social Sciences and Psychology at either Bankstown or Kingswood. This ‘essay’ is to be presented as a series of short paragraphs defining each of the following terms: Consequentialist and Non-consequentalist views of morality Absolutism and Relativism Virtue Ethics Where appropriate explain the differences between each with a short example which demonstrates your understanding. It does not require an introduction or conclusion. In your paragraphs you will need to clarify how you understand the terms and provide an example which illustrates each term. It is not adequate to simply restate the definitions from the text books. The length of the essay will be approximately 1000 words (maximum 1100 words). The essay will relate to the material covered in lectures and tutorials in weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4. No library research is required for this essay; only material from the texts, tutorials, and lectures need be utilised. Return of Marks: This work will be available in week 9 or returned in class week 10 ASSESSMENT 2: Criteria and standards Criterion Fail Pass Credit Distinction High Distinction Each ethical term is described Terms are incomplete and not coherently defined All terms are defined, but there are gaps, inaccuracies or minor errors in definitions Definitions are sound and clear, with few mistakes Sound definitions are given with clear examples, very few errors Each term is defined precisely and flawlessly Differences are identified between each term and are exemplified No differences or inaccurate differences are presented Some differences given with examples Sound differences are given for each term and good examples provided in the main Sound differences, with good examples for every term consistently Differences are described and exemplified clearly, with excellent examples in every case Evidence of text, lecture and tutorial material is provided There is little or no evidence of text or class materials used The terms are referenced from the text and/or class materials in each case Every term is identified with solid referencing of the text and class materials Every term is exemplified with appropriate references and few errors Evidence from texts/class materials is clearly identified and flawlessly referencedLearning Guide 2013-Autumn 101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences Page 9 of 11 Writing, Structure and grammar are competent and error free Poor writing, sentence structure and grammar. Inaccurate or no referencing of material Writing is coherent with generally sound grammar and spelling. Some evidence of mistakes. Sound writing, coherent structure and very few errors of a minor nature. Excellent writing, well structured and substantially error free Flawless writing – structure, grammar and spelling ASSESSMENT 3: Case study report Weighting: 40% Assessment format: Report Length/Duration: 2000 words Due date and time: BEFORE 5PM Week 13 (day of lecture) Late penalty: If the assignment is submitted (without an approved extension) after th
e due da
te and time, it will attract a late penalty of 10% per day (including weekends) up to a maximum of 10 days, at which time the penalty will be 100% of what the assignment is worth. Assessments will not be accepted after the marked assessment task has been returned to students who submitted the task on time. Also see section on Extension, Special Consideration, and late assignment penalties in attached Social Science Student Resources document. Submission method: Turnitin and hard copy to relevant School of Social Sciences and Psychology assignment box Is assessment compulsory? Yes, you must complete this assessment in order to be eligible to pass the unit (as explained in Section 5) regardless of the aggregate mark you achieve across assessments. Is Cover Sheet required? Yes, you must use the correct cover sheet located in the Cover Sheets attachment ASSESSMENT 3: Description and instructions Due on the day of the lecture Week 13, strictly no later than 5pm in the assignment boxes in the School of Social Sciences and Psychology at either Bankstown or Kingswood. You are required to choose one of the several case studies listed on vUWS. You will analyse this case study from two ethical frameworks studied this semester and discuss how each position offers a way of understanding the issue and of responding to it. N.B. Policing students are required to undertak the specific policing case study that applies to policing. In your introduction briefly identify which case study you are using. Introduce the two frameworks you are using to analyse the case study and briefly describe them. In the body of your paper you will be required to apply them to the case study. This means critically analysing how aspects of the case study might be understood from the two different theoretical frameworks you have chosen. Your conclusion should address the implications of these two positions for the case study, the people involved and the broader community. You must use at least 5 academic references, and may use references other than those listed in the learning guide. Wikipedia will not be considered a legitimate reference. Please be advised that websites are of inconsistent value and you need to be vigilant in your use of various websites. DO Write your assignment using headings that address the assessment criteria – this helps you to organise your thoughts and structure your assignment and makes it easier for us (the markers) to see what you have done. DO Use economy of expression – be succinct and concise – brief and clear.Learning Guide 2013-Autumn 101555-Ethics in the Social Sciences Page 10 of 11 DO Use Harvard referencing style (i.e. author-date). Your tutor will give an overview and resources are available in vUWS. DO Use all the references provided (as indicated in the description of the references). DO Use double-line spacing – one side of the page only. DO Use 12 point font – Arial or Times New Roman. DO Use the correct coversheet with an accurate word count inserted. DO Keep within the word limit (i.e. 1,000 words +/- 10%). DO NOT Exceed the word limit (i.e. 1,000 words +/- 10%). DO Write in ‘essay style’ (i.e. using correct sentence and paragraph construction). DO NOT Use excessive dot points or other lists. DO Use a level of English expression that does not mask the content – we can only mark what we can read and understand reasonably well. ASSESSMENT 3: Criteria and standards Criterion Fail Pass Credit Distinction High Distinction Briefly identify which case study you are using. Introduce the two frameworks you are using to analyse the case and briefly describe them Essay fails to identify case study or frameworks, or fails to coherently introduce them Case is identified with two frameworks to be applied. Descriptions are partial (or excessive). Case study clearly identified with a succinct description of the frameworks to be applied Excellent descriptive summary of the frameworks and their suitability to the case study chosen Outstanding, coherent description of the chosen frameworks and their applicability Description of how each framework applies to the study with critical analysis Inadequate desacriptiona dn no analysis Adequate descriptionbut little analysis Good description and analysis, critical analysis less well developed Excellent description and good critical analysis Strong emphasis of critical issues brought out by the application of the chosen frameworks – flawlessly presented Implications of these two positions for the case study, the people involved and the broader community. Shows little or no understanding of implications of the frameworks as applied Limited understanding of implication of the frameworks. Identifies and describes implications with limited reference to critical issues Strong argument for implications and critical understanding of how these apply Clear and confident exposition of the implications mad in a sophisticated manner Writing, Structure and grammar are competent and error free and appropriate referencing is used Poor writing, sentence structure and grammar. Inaccurate or no referencing of material Writing is coherent with generally sound grammar and spelling. Some evidence of mistakes. Sound writing, coherent structure and very few errors of a minor nature. Excellent writing, well structured and substantially error free Flawless writing – structure, grammar and spellingASSESSMENT 4: No fourth assessmentNo fourth assessment Weighting: 0% Assessment format: Length/Duration: Due date and time: Late penalty: Submission method: Is assessment compulsory? Is Cover Sheet required? ASSESSMENT 4: Description and instructions ASSESSMENT 4: Criteria and standards

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