Roxane Gay presents clear arguments both for and against the use of trigger warnings, but her main point addresses something other than just those warnings. What does she want readers to know? Do you find her argument persuasive? Why or why not?

The illusion of Safety/The safety of illusion by Roxane Gay
Roxane Gay presents clear arguments both for and against the use of trigger warnings, but her main point addresses something other than just those warnings. What does she want readers to know? Do you find her argument persuasive? Why or why not?
Gay’s essay is sprinkled with short, terse sentences (“I hate writing” [18].) and occasionally even fragments (“But” [36].) Find three more examples of such terse bits. What is the effect of these occasional breaks in the rhythmic flow of her prose? What do they accomplish? Are they effective? Why or why not?
Although she never offers a direct narrative of any of her experiences, Gay makes it clear that she speaks from personal experience of violence. How does she make her experience clear without narrating what happened? How effective is her technique? Would a narrative have conveyed more effectively the argument she is making about trigger warnings? Why or why not? Explain your conclusion.
Gay states very explicitly: “I don’t believe in trigger warnings” (23). Still, at several points throughout her essay she concedes that trigger warnings can be useful, even “necessary” (32). Do her concessions about the value of trigger warnings weaken her argument? Strengthen it? Why do you think so? Explain your reasoning and point to specific passages that support your evaluation.
Gay’s style of personal reflection and disclosure almost invites readers to respond, to enter a conversation with her. Imagine sitting next to her on a plane or sharing a table with her at the school cafeteria. What would you like to as her or tell her? Imagine your conversation. Write a two-paragraph reflection that responds to her as though she were at your side listening.

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